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dhhs state sc us internet pdf manuals appendix

Not a MyNAP member yet. Register for a free account to start saving and receiving special member only perks. Additional covered services may be available if medically necessary ( Alabama Medicaid Agency, 2013 ). Contact lenses may be provided only under certain conditions and when approved ahead of time ( Alabama Medicaid Agency, 2013 ). Pregnant women with family income are eligible up to 200 of FPL ( Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, 2016 ). “As of September 1, 2015, other adults with family income up to 138 of FPL; blind or disabled individuals who qualify for Alaska Adult Public Assistance” ( Norris, 2015a ). Additional vision exams covered if medically necessary. If glasses are required, “Medicaid will pay for one pair of Medicaid-approved glasses per calendar year” ( Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, 2012 ). One additional pair of eyeglasses covered if medically necessary. Any subsequent eyeglasses covered with prior authorization based upon medical justification submitted by provider. Vision therapy services covered ( Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, 2012, 2013 ). Medicaid will pay for one pair of Medicaid-approved glasses per calendar year. One company makes all of the eyeglasses for Medicaid. The same eye doctor that gives you a prescription can order your glasses. If you want different frames or a feature that is not covered, you will need to pay the entire cost of the glasses yourself. The amount that Medicaid would have paid cannot be applied to the cost of other glasses. Additional vision coverage may be authorized if medically necessary” ( Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, 2012 ). Children ages 1 to 5 with income up to 141 of FPL, and aged 6 to 19 with income up to 133 of FPL ( AHCCCS, 2016a ). Pregnant women Contact lenses, if medically necessary, are covered but require Only members under 21 years old... receive coverage for eyeglasses (frames and lenses)” ( CDHCS, 2016a ).

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This is limited to one pair of glasses every 2 years. For lost or broken glasses, an interim pair will be covered once in 2 years. “Contact lens testing may be covered if the use of eyeglasses is not possible due to eye disease or condition. Low-vision testing is available for those with vision impairment that is not correctable by standard glasses, contact lenses, medicine This is limited to one pair of glasses every 2 years. For lost or broken glasses, an interim pair will be covered once in 2 years. Contacts are allowed only if eyeglasses do not correct the refraction error.Does not include orthotic or eye training therapy ( COHCPF, 2016 ). HUSKY B: Children up to 318 of FPL. HUSKY D: Childless adults with incomes up to 138 of FPL” ( Anderson, 2015a ). For members who are age 21 or older, one (1) pair of eyeglasses will be covered every 2 years. If there has been a serious change in vision and the member needs a new prescription for eyeglasses, they will be covered. No exception will be made for eyeglasses that are lost, stolen, or broken” ( Husky Health Connecticut, 2015, p. 16). Special lenses may be covered when specific criteria are met, lenses are considered necessary, and a prior authorization is submitted. The DMAP may cover contact lenses to correct a medical condition if the medical condition is not correctable with eyeglasses. This service must be prior authorized ( DMAP, n.d. ). Examination limited to the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions ( DMAP, 2016 ). A minimum diopter correction is required. Repairs or replacements covered if medically necessary ( DHCF, 2016 ). A minimum diopter correction is required ( DHCF, 2012, 2016 ). People who qualify for Supplemental Security Income automatically qualify for Medicaid” ( Norris, 2015d ).

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Contact lenses are limited to “when the recipient has a documented medical condition where eyeglasses would not provide any benefit for their visual impairment” ( Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, 2015, p. 3). Other services for enrollees under age 21 covered if approved and medically necessary (Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, 2015). Metal frames are covered when medically necessary. Eyeglass repair is covered except for when cost exceeds that of new eyeglasses ( Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, 2015 ). “Only elements of the frames or lenses that are damaged beyond repair may be replaced” ( Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, 2015, p. 3). Second exams covered with prior approval, second glasses covered with minimum diopter change. Polycarbonate lenses covered if medically necessary. Contact lenses covered with prior approval. Replacement Adults are not eligible for eyeglasses, refractions, dispensing fees, and other refractive services. Members can receive medical diagnostic and treatment services for ocular disease. Vision therapy is covered with prior approval ( Georgia DCH, 2016 ). Replacement of lost eyeglasses not covered. New lenses must improve visual acuity by at least one line on a standard acuity chart. Vision therapy covered with prior approval ( Children’s Vision Georgia, 2013; Georgia DCH, 2016 ). Pregnant women with family income up to 191 of FPL. Adults with family income up to 133 of FPL” ( Norris, 2015e ). More frequent exams covered if medically necessary with prior authorization ( Hawaii Department of Health, 2011a ). More frequent exams covered if medically necessary with prior authorization. Prescription lenses and cataract removal covered for all members ( Hawaii Department of Health, 2011a ).

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Non-covered services include “tinted lenses (except in the case of aphakia); contact lenses for cosmetic purposes; bifocal contact lenses; oversized lenses; blended or progressive bifocal lenses; tinted or absorptive lenses (except for aphakia, albinism, glaucoma, medical photophobia); trifocal lenses (except as a specific job requirement); spare glasses” ( Hawaii Department of Health, 2011b, p. 3) Parents with family income up to 124 of FPL... additional eligibility criteria for individuals who are aged or disabled” ( Noris, 2016c ). Tinted lenses only covered with a diagnosis of albinism or other extreme medical condition. Contact lenses covered in extreme conditions when eyeglasses are not medically sufficient. Replacement of broken or lost frames is not covered ( Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, 2009 ). Pregnant women with family income up to 208 of FPL. Adults with family income up to 133 of FPL” ( Anderson, 2016 ). Medically necessary contact lenses.Pregnant women with household income up to 208 of FPL. Adults with incomes up to 138 of FPL can enroll in HIP 2.0” ( Norris, 2015f ). Tinted and polycarbonate lenses covered when medically necessary ( IHCP, 2016 ). Coverage for eyeglasses, including frames and lenses, is limited to a maximum of one pair every 5 years. Tinted and polycarbonate lenses covered when medically necessary ( IHCP, 2016 ). Children ages Adults with family income up to 133 of FPL” ( Norris, 2016d ). Contact lenses covered following cataract surgery or other extreme conditions when vision cannot be corrected with glasses. Vision therapy covered when medically necessary. Polycarbonate lenses and safety frames covered for children through 7 years and when medically necessary ( Iowa Department of Human Services, 2014 ). Contact lenses covered following cataract surgery or other extreme conditions when vision cannot be corrected with glasses.

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Replacement of lost or damaged glasses is covered once every 12 months except when member has mental or physical disability. Polycarbonate lenses and safety frames covered when medically necessary ( Iowa Department of Human Services, 2014 ). Kansas provides Medicaid coverage through three managed care organizations (MCOs), all of which cover eyeglasses. One of the MCOs (United Healthcare) has more expansive benefits, stating coverage for a “better choice of eyeglass frames... replacement if glasses are lost or stolen” and possibly contact lenses for some members ( KanCare, 2016 ). Pregnant women with family income up to 195 of FPL. Adults with income up to 133 of FPL” Physician office visits limited to two every 12 months per diagnosis.Physician office visits limited to two every 12 months per diagnosis. Eyeglasses are not covered. Contact lenses are not covered ( Kentucky CHFS, 2007 ). Contact lenses not covered ( Kentucky CHFS, 2007 ). Pregnant women with household income up to 133 of FPL. Regular eyeglasses are covered when they meet a certain minimum strength requirement. Medically necessary specialty eyewear and contact lenses can be covered with prior authorization. Contact lenses are covered if they are the only means for restoring vision. Other related services may be covered if medically necessary” ( Louisiana Medicaid, 2016, p. 18). Contact lenses not covered. “One pair of eyeglasses per lifetime is covered when the power is equal to or greater than 10.00 diopters” ( Maine DHHS, 2012, p. 5). Replacement frames and repairs covered ( Maine DHHS, 2012 ). Glasses must be purchased through the state contractor. Tint, photochromatic, or ultraviolet (UV) lenses covered when medically necessary. Orthoptic therapy covered with prior authorization when medically necessary ( Maine DHHS, 2012 ). Glasses must be purchased through the state contractor. Tint, photochromatic, or UV lenses covered when medically necessary.

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Orthoptic therapy covered with prior authorization when medically necessary ( Maine DHHS, 2012 ). Pregnant women with household income up to 250 of FPL. Adults with household income up to 133 of FPL. Aged, blind, or disabled individuals” ( Anderson, 2014 ). Replacement eyeglasses covered. One eye exam covered every year ( Maryland DHMH, 2014 ). Glasses are not covered ( Maryland DHMH, n.d. ). Pregnant women with household income up to 200 of FPL. Adults with household income up to 133 of FPL” ( Anderson, 2015f ). More often if medically necessary. One pair of eyeglasses covered. New pair covered with a specific change in prescription. Replacement glasses covered, but only covered within the first 12 months with prior authorization. Eyeglass repairs covered. Tinted lenses and contact lenses covered if medically necessary ( MassHealth, 2008 ). More often if medically necessary. Eyeglass repairs covered after the first 12 months. Tinted lenses and contacts covered if medically necessary ( MassHealth, 2008 ). Pregnant women with household income up to 195 of FPL. Adults with household income up to 133 of FPL” ( Anderson, Pregnant women with household income up to 278 of FPL. Adults with household income up to 138 of FPL; adults with income between 138 and 200 of FPL qualify for MNCare” ( Norris, 2015i ). If improvement is not noted after four sessions, the recipient must be referred to an appropriate professional (for example, neurologist or ophthalmologist) for further evaluation” ( Minnesota DHS, 2016 ). Tinted, UV, polarized and photochromatic lenses covered if medically necessary ( Minnesota DHS, 2016 ). Contact lenses covered with medically necessary diagnosis or with prior authorization ( Minnesota DHS, 2016 ). Children are eligible for Medicaid. Eligible for more services if medically necessary” ( Mississippi Contact lenses provided for specific disease or injury ( Mississippi Division of Medicaid, 2014 ).

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Children are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP with household incomes up to 300 of FPL, and pregnant women are eligible with household incomes up to 196 of FPL” ( Healthinsurance.org, 2015a ). Frames covered once every 24 months. Lenses covered if medically necessary or required for school performance once every 2 years. Photochromatic, tinted, and polycarbonate lenses covered when medically necessary.Frames covered once every 24 months. Lenses covered if medically necessary once every 2 years. Photochromatic, tinted, and polycarbonate lenses covered when medically necessary. Replacement frames not covered unless significant change in diopter.One exam per year, unless medically necessary. Glasses providers Glasses providers must show One pair of glasses covered every 365 days, but most add-ons, including photo-grey lenses, are not covered ( Montana DPHHS, 2013, 2016 ). Most add-ons, including photo-grey lenses, are not covered ( Montana DPHHS, 2013 ). Pregnant women with income up to 194 of poverty ( Nebraska DHHS, 2016 ). CHIP is up to 213 of poverty ( Nebraska DHHS, 2016 ). Adults that meet criteria for the aged, blind, and disabled with income up to 100 of the poverty level. More frequent eye exams covered if medically necessary. Vision therapy covered when medically necessary ( NMAP, 2003 ). Repairs covered when less costly then new frames. Contact lenses covered when medically necessary. Vision therapy training covered when medically necessary. Polycarbonate, tint, and UV frames covered when medically necessary. ( NMAP, 2003 ). Also, coverage is available if your household Optometrists and ophthalmologists may perform such exams without prior authorization upon request or identification of medical need. “Medical Need” may be identified as any ophthalmological examination performed to diagnose, treat, or follow any ophthalmological condition that has been identified....

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Glasses may be provided at any interval without prior authorization for EPSDT recipients, as long as there is a change in refractive status from the most recent exam, or for broken or lost glasses” ( DHCFP, 2015, p. 7). Any exceptions require prior authorization” ( DHCFP, 2015, p. 7). Lenses are covered with prior authorization. Vision therapy covered with prior authorization ( DHCFP, 2015 ). One MCO (NH Health Families) offers a vision credit if someone opts for frames outside of standard benefits ( New Hampshire Medicaid Care Management, 2015 ). In addition, individuals are covered on the basis of being elderly, blind, or disabled ( Norris, 2016g ). Trifocal lenses for work. Eye exams covered “to diagnose and monitor medical conditions of the eye” ( New Hampshire Medicaid, 2013, p. 4). Also, adults with income up to 138 of poverty, and pregnant women with income up to 200 of poverty. Children are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP with income up to Age 19 to 59—Replacement eyeglasses or contact lenses every two years if prescription changes. Replacement eyeglasses or contact lenses may be dispensed more frequently if significant vision changes occur. Contact Also, adults with income up to 138 of poverty. Pregnant women are eligible for pregnancy-related coverage with household income up to 250 of poverty.One frame and one set of corrective lenses covered per year; “more frequently when an ophthalmologist or optometrist recommends a change in prescription due to a medical condition” ( NMAC, 2010 ). Polycarbonate lenses are covered. New lenses covered for diopter changes to plus or minus 0.75 or with the diagnosis of certain medical conditions; if the lenses cannot fit into the existing frames, frames will be replaced as well. One frame and set of corrective lenses covered every 36 months; “more frequently when an ophthalmologist or optometrist recommends a change in prescription due to a medical condition” ( NMAC, 2010 ).

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New lenses covered for diopter changes to plus or minus 0.75 or with the diagnosis of certain medical conditions. Contact lenses covered with prior authorization. Lost or broken eyeglasses covered with documentation on the recipient’s visual examination record ( NMAC, 2010 ). Medicaid expansion recipients are not covered for eye exams to correct refract error or eyeglasses. Eye exams only Lost or broken eyeglasses covered with documentation on the recipient’s visual examination record ( NMAC, 2010 ). Eyeglasses only covered following cataracts removal surgery. Pregnant women and infants to age 1 with income up to 223 of poverty level. Separate CHIP is available in New York for all children with income up to 400 of poverty level ( Norris, 2015m ). Glasses are covered when the initial correction or change in correction is at least.50 diopter ( New York State Medicaid Program, 2013 ). Eyeglass lenses may be changed more frequently than every 2 years when medically necessary. Orthoptic training may be covered with prior authorization ( New York State Medicaid Program, 2013 ). “The maximum time period for which approval of a treatment plan will be granted is 6 months. At the end of the 6 month approved period, it is necessary to reapply for prior approval and supply information that details the progress made, the anticipated treatment plan, and the prognosis” ( New York State Medicaid Program, 2013, p. 13). Also, parents with dependent children are eligible for Medicaid with a household income up to 45 percent of poverty level, and children are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP with incomes up to 211 of poverty; maternity-related coverage is available for pregnant women with incomes up to 196 of poverty” ( Norris, 2015n ). Eligible for eyeglasses once per year with prior approval. Eligible for contact lenses if medically necessary with prior approval ( NC DMA, 2015b ).

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Children are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP with household incomes up to 170 of poverty ( Norris, 2015o ). Exceptions made when medically necessary. Eye glasses covered once every 365 days ( NDDHS, 2011 ). More often if medically necessary with prior Exceptions made when medically necessary, or for adult diabetic clients ( NDDHS, 2011 ). Eyeglasses covered once every 2 years. More often if medically necessary with prior authorization. Photochromic, certain tints, UV, slab-off, and Fresnel prism lenses covered if medically necessary with prior authorization ( NDDHS, 2011 ). Some hard contact lenses covered for the correction of certain conditions. Replacement lenses and frames covered after 24 months ( NDDHS, 2010 ). “An exception to the replacement limitation may be made Replacement lenses and frames covered within the 12-month warranty with prior authorization. Contact lenses provided when medically necessary ( NDDHS, 2011 ). Children are eligible with incomes up to 206 of FPL, and pregnant women are eligible with incomes up to 200 of FPL” ( Norris, 2015p ). Contact lenses covered with prior authorization. Medical and surgical services covered when medically necessary ( ODM, n.d. ). Coverage includes one set of lenses and frames per year. Any glasses beyond this limit must be prior authorized and determined to be medically necessary” ( OHCA, 2015 ). Determination of the refractive state is covered when medically necessary” ( OHCA, 2015 ). Also, coverage is available if household income does not exceed 133 of poverty (185 for pregnant women and infants). CHIP is available for children with household incomes up to 300 of poverty” ( Norris, 2016h ). Contact lenses not covered ( OHP, n.d. ). For nonpregnant adults eye exams covered for eye conditions “except for disorders of refraction and accommodation (e.g. nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism). Diagnostic services are still covered” ( OHP, n.d. ).

Glasses covered for pregnant adults and other adults when medically necessary due to conditions such as aphakia or after cataracts surgery. Contact lenses not covered ( OHP, n.d. ). Children in households with incomes up to 319 of FPL are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP” ( Norris, 2015q ). Additional eyeglasses or contact lenses may be approved if medically necessary. With fee-for-service, eyeglasses or contact lenses covered only with a diagnosis of aphakia. Eyeglasses may be covered without diagnoses for adults enrolled in a managed care plan. Also, adults with income up to 133 of poverty, pregnant women Office visits covered for diagnosis and treatment when medically necessary. “The RI Medicaid program does not pay for a spare pair of eyeglasses; information provided over the telephone; cancelled office visits or appointments not kept; lost or stolen frames or lenses. The Medicaid program will not pay for any procedures or services that are unproved, experimental or research in nature. Services which are not medically necessary to treat the patient’s condition, or are not directly related to the patient’s diagnosis, symptoms or medical history are not reimbursable” ( State of Rhode Island, 2016 ). Also children with household incomes up to 208 of FPL; working parents with dependent children with household incomes up to 89 of FPL; jobless parents with dependent children with household incomes up to 50 of FPL; pregnant women with household incomes up to 194 of FPL” ( Norris, 2015s ). All lenses must be polycarbonate. Repairs covered as necessary. Replacements covered once per year. Contact lenses covered when medically necessary ( South Carolina Health Connections, 2016 ). Orthotic and pleoptic Routine vision services are defined as services related to refractive care: routine eye exams, refractions, corrective lenses, and glasses.

Services related to disease of the eye are covered for an example glaucoma, conjunctivitis and cataracts” ( South Carolina Health Connections, 2016, p. 2-198). “Adults can get an eye exam every year and a pair of glasses following cataract surgery” ( South Carolina Healthy Connections, 2008, p. 15). Contact lenses are covered only when necessary for the correction of certain conditions. Replacement eyeglasses covered if 15 months have passed and a lens change is medically necessary” ( SD DSS, 2015, p. 19). Optometrists and opticians may be seen without a referral; ophthalmology appointments require a referral ( SD DSS, 2015 ). Also, parents with dependent children are eligible with household incomes up to 15 of FPL. Children are eligible for This limit does not apply to diagnostic or other treatment of the eye for medical conditions” ( Texas Medicaid, 2015 ). Replacement eyewear is not covered ( Texas Medicaid, 2015 ). Utah’s guidelines also provide for other groups to obtain coverage depending on circumstances” ( Norris, 2015w ). Additional eye exams can be done when medically necessary ( Utah Department of Health, Damaged lens or frame repair covered as long as not due to member neglect or abuse once every 12 months ( Utah Department of Health, 2015 ). Replacement glasses covered with change of 0.75 in diopter or when disease or damage to eye makes it medically necessary ( Utah Department of Health, 2015 ). Contact lenses covered when medically necessary ( Utah Department of Health, 2015 ). Children with household incomes up to 312 of FPL, and pregnant women with incomes up to 208 of FPL ( CMS, 2014 ). Lenses are polycarbonate ( DVHA, 2015 ). Replacement glasses covered within a 24-month period, and certain special lenses covered with prior authorization ( DVHA, 2016a ).

Routine eye exams with the following limitations: one comprehensive eye exam and one intermediate eye exam are covered within a 2-year period, or two intermediate eye exams within a 2-year period. Non-eyewear aids to vision (such as closed circuit television) when the beneficiary is legally blind and when providing the aid to vision will foster independence by improving at least one activity of daily living” are covered with prior authorization ( DVHA, 2012, p. 102). Eyeglasses, lenses, and contact lenses are not covered ( DVHA, 2016a ). Also, parents with dependent children Tinted lenses covered when medically More frequent eye exams covered if medically necessary. Repair of frames Eye exercises covered when medically necessary. Written documentation of need required after six sessions of orthoptic trainings ( DMAS, 2012 ). Repairs covered more often if medically justified ( DMAS, 2012 ). Also, adults with incomes up to 133 of FPL; children with household incomes up to 210 of FPL are eligible for no-premium Medicaid; children with household incomes 260 to 312 of FPL eligible (with premium); pregnant women with incomes up to 193 of FPL ( Washington Apple Health, 2016c ). Eye exam covered for asymptomatic clients once every 12 months ( Washington Apple Health, 2016a ). Orthotics, vision therapy, cataract surgery, strabismus surgery, blepharoplasty surgery, and implantable miniature telescope are covered services ( Washington Apple Health, 2016a ). Also, adults with incomes up to 138 of FPL; children with household incomes up to 300 of FPL are eligible for CHIP; pregnant women with incomes up to 158 of FPL” ( Norris, 2016i ). Frames are covered, as are replacements when the frames cannot be used or repaired. Contacts covered when medically necessary for a given condition.Addition diagnostic evaluations may be reimbursed if there is a documented, justifiable need.

Glasses coverage is limited to beneficiaries post-cataract operation (within 60 days of surgery) ( West Virginia BMS, 2015 ). Contact lenses covered with diagnosis of keratoconus or aphakia ( West Virginia BMS, 2015 ). Also, children and pregnant women with incomes up to 300 of poverty; other adults with incomes up to 100 of poverty” ( Norris, 2014b ). One low vision exam is covered once per year with prior authorization ( ForwardHealth, 2016 ). Cataract surgery covered when medically necessary. Contact lenses covered with prior authorization if medically necessary. Contact lenses covered without prior authorization with diagnosis of aphakia or keratoconus. Contact lens replacements covered once per year. Eyeglasses covered once per year. Minor repairs covered. Replacements for lost or damaged glasses covered once per year. Any addition replacements require prior approval ( ForwardHealth, 2016 ). Parents with dependent children are eligible with household incomes up to 56 of poverty” ( Norris, 2015x ). Replacement of lenses and frames allowed once. Contact lenses covered if medically necessary with prior authorization. Vision therapy covered without prior authorization. ( Wyoming Department of Health, 2016 ). Eye exams are only covered for the treatment of eye disease or eye injury. Medical treatment is covered for beneficiaries who are either at risk for eye disease due to chronic illness or otherwise, or with eye injuries ( Wyoming Department of Health, n.d. ). Individual prescription copay are not always listed for each state but are typically Phoenix: AHCCCS. (accessed June 30, 2016). Phoenix: AHCCCS. (accessed June 30, 2016). Montgomery: Alabama Medicaid Agency. (accessed June 30, 2016). Montgomery: Alabama Medicaid Agency. (accessed June 30, 2016). Anchorage: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). In Alaska medical assistrance provider billing manual. Anchorage: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.

(accessed June 30, 2016). Anchorage: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). Little Rock, AR: Division of Medical Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Human Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). Menlo Park, CA: The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Atlanta: Children’s Vision Georgia. (accessed June 30, 2016). Baltimore, MD: CMS. (accessed June 30, 2016). Frankfort: Kentucky Department of Medicaid Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). Washington: Government of the District of Columbia. (accessed June 30, 2016). Washington: Government of the District of Columbia. (accessed June 30, 2016). Carson City: Nevada Department of Health and Human Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). New Castle: Delaware Health and Social Services. (accessed June 30, 2016). Waterbury: Vermont Agency of Human Services. (accessed April 8, 2016). Waterbury: Vermont Agency of Human Services. (accessed April 8, 2016). Waterbury: Vermont Agency of Human Services. (accessed May 31, 2016). Tallahasse: Florida Department of Children and Families. Madison: Wisconsin Department of Health Services. (accessed May 26, 2016). Atlanta, GA: Georgia DCH. (accessed May 19, 2016). In Hawaii Medicaid provider manual. Honolulu: Hawaii Department of Health. (accessed May 18, 2016). Honolulu: Haiwaii Department of Health. (accessed April 8, 2016). Caldwell: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. (accessed April 12, 2016). Chicago: Illinois Department of HFS. (accessed April 8, 2016). Chicago: Illinois Department of HFS. (accessed April 12, 2016). Des Moines: Iowa Department of Human Services. (accessed May 19, 2016). Topeka: Kansas Department of Health and Environment. (accessed April 8, 2016). Frankfort: Kentucky Department of Medicaid Services. (accessed April 8, 2016). Topeka: KHPA. (accessed May 19, 2016). In Chapter 101: MaineCare benefits manual.Baltimore: Maryland DHMH. St Paul: Minnesota DHS. (accessed April 14, 2016).